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Morris

Film
Thin Blue Line: Five Key Witnesses
I have often heard people say that "The Thin Blue Line" got an innocent man out of prison.

Yes and no.

The movie brought the case to national attention, but it was my investigation part of which was done with a movie camera that got Randall Adams out of prison. Here's the story.

There were five key prosecution witnesses in the 1977 trial against Randall Adams. I was able to discredit their testimomy and to establish that each and every one of them committed perjury.

1. David Harris claimed that he was in the passenger's seat when the Comet was stopped by DPO Robert Wood, that Adams was driving and that Adams killed the police officer. Adams, on the other hand, always claimed that he was home in bed. That they had left the 183 Drive-In before 11:00 PM. The murder occurred after midnight. Harris confessed to me that he was alone in the car, and Adams's claim that they left the 180 Drive-In much earlier in the evening was born out by my investigation of the movie schedule that evening.

2. Teresa Turko claimed that she was out of the patrol car and at the back window of the Comet when her partner was shot and killed. I discovered an Internal Affairs memo never revealed to the defense that discredits her trial testimony. I also interviewed an Internal Affairs investigator who revealed that Turko had been hypnotized, leaving open the possibility of post-hypnotic suggestion. He also believe that she had never left the police car until after the shooting. Also, her comments at the crime scene never indicated that there was more than one person in the car.

3. Emily Miller claimed she got a good look at the driver of the car and testified in court that she had picked Adams out in a police lineup. She inadvertently revealed to me (on film) that she had failed to pick out Adams in a police lineup, further evidence that she had committed perjury at trial.

4. R.L. Miller also claimed he got a good look at the driver of the car. He told me (on film) that he hadn't seen much of anything, although in one spooky moment, he described the driver's hair as "dishwater blonde," a much better description of Harris than Adams.

5. Michael Randell claimed in court that he got a good look at the driver of the car, but he told me (on film) that he hadn't seen much of anything, and there is evidence he traded his testimony for favorable treatment by the Dallas Police Department and the Dallas D.A.'s office.


Dallas Times Herald - Sunday, October 23, 1988.

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